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Planned completion date and completion date

8 replies [Last post]
Emmanuelle Prefol
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Morning,

Pretty new to the concepts of planned completion date/completion date and terminal float, so pls bear with me.

Should planned completion date and completion date be the same on an initial programme submitted for acceptance?

Thanks.

 

 

Replies

Gary Whitehead
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(1) planned completion date = date when contractor's programme shows he will complete the works

(2) completion date = date when contract stipulates work must be completed by

(3) early planned completion date = a special case of (1), when it is earlier than (2). This is when you get terminal float.

 

Emmanuelle Prefol
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Gary, both you and Anoon are referring to a "planned early completion date"/"early planned completion date".

I have not come across this terminology,  is this the "planned completion date"?

Gary Whitehead
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There is no contractual obligation either way.

 

For an employer, I see it as a good thing for your contractor to be showing an early planned completion, because:

a)  it means some contractor delay can occur without impacting on your completion date

b) there's a stronger chance of getting beneficial use early

c) it is indicative that the contractor has put some thought into his programme durations, rather than just filling up the time between start and completion.

Emmanuelle Prefol
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Thanks Gary.

We (employer) operate under NEC3.

Trying to understand pros/cons of  the initial contractor's showing terminal float or not as we receive both types.

I have not found anything under lasue 31.2 that says it should or it should not.

Anoon Iimos
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I guess if you have any intention to complete your project early, you need to reveal it to your client in the early stage of the project (Planned Early Completion); otherwise, you may not get any chance of claiming for acceleration cost.

Emmanuelle Prefol
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Thanks Mike.

Thinking about it now, this makes prefect sense for the contractor to have have some terminal float on the initial programme as this "absorbs" contractor's delays, am I corect in saying this?

How then is the terminal float duration assessed? Is there maximum/minium?

E.

Gary Whitehead
User offline. Last seen 2 years 21 weeks ago. Offline

It largely depends on what type of contract you are worknig under.

 

If it's an NEC type contract, which recognises terminal float as belonging to the contractor, then yes generally your planned completion would be earlier than completion date on initial programme (but doesn't have to be)

 

If it's a contract type where terminal float belongs to the client or the "project" (ie whoever runs late first), then it is the contractor's interest to show planned completion = completion date by hiding float in task durations, and in the client's interests to try and catch him doing it (difficult to prove).

Mike Testro
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Hi Emmanuelle

Welcome to planning planet

It is good planning practice to have the planned completion date a bit earlier than the contract completion date.

This is sometimes called "Terminal Float" and the contractor often claims it as his own buffer.

Best regards

Mike Testro