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Construction Benchmarking

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Saleh Elshobokshi
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I want to share with you all my concern regarding how to measure a construction project progress. In planning books they always refer to cost as the benchmak. My view is that cost alone is not the right image of a project progress because, as an example block works is cheap while it takes long time, while setting out a A/C chiller on its base is costly while it take only few days. So my view is that the progress of a construction project should be a compination of three elements, cost, duration, and it is importance weight in the project.

Can you please share me with your practical experience nad ideas.

Thanks

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Mike Harvey
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Visit hpcconsult.co.uk it may help your problem. See the 'Planning Academy' page. Regards Mike Harvey
William Stakelin
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There are many things that help to track the progress of the project. Materials are one. You must track your shop drawings (being submited by sub-contractors and approved by the architect) to insure that materials are recieved in a timely fashion so as not to delay progress. You should define items with long leed times. One item might delay several sub-contractors or delay the entire project. Even though you show progress as work complete to date compared against a baseline you need to track your materials. This is an important factor in schedualing a project.

William E. Stakelin
Mohd Mahd
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well, i think it went back to the same statement (..work execution should be measured in its own appropriate resource...). i think, it represents, a fact, that, every activity has its own way of evaluation and measurement. my regargs for all, mohd
Ernesto Puyana
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I think the best solution to this discussion is EVPM. Each activity's progress is measured in it's own units, translated to percent complete and used to compute earned value. In this environment, the A/C unit discussion looses relevance, since all you do is compare a budget against a real progress. The point is how much does each activity contribute to the whole effort. Well, you can manage that computing earned value in either dollars, man-hours, steel tons, concrete M3, etc.
Tomas Rivera
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Another point of view from the comments above:
Progress acomplished, by itself, does not really mean anything useful. What is more important is how much we have acomplished compared to our baseline progress metrics. In other words, have we acomplished as much as we need to, to date? You can measure this in terms of cost, duration or any resource metrics. It does not really matter as long as you are consistent with your measurements. Better yet, you should have two progress baseline curves. One for the earliest baseline schedule and another for the latest baseline schedule. Your actual progress should fall in between these two curves.
One word of caution: progress is only one side of the coin for making sure our project is on track.
Ernesto Montales
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I definitely agree, in our practice, we measure progress based on physical accomplishment. It not good to report that a particular equipment is there, of it is not installed it is still not a deliverable. It does not serve its function.
Mohd Mahd
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no body can disagree with that statement "work execution should be measured in its own appropriate resource" as progress measurements varies with every recourse involved and its activity. as far as electromechanical contractor, installing A/C chiller, is an important milestone. and for a civil one, block works is a time consuming activity. for a main contractor, who needs to know when will pay that much.
Saleh Elshobokshi
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I do not agree with your with regard to cost, take and example of the A/C Chiller it costs a lot compared to 1 m sq of render lets say. When I deliver this chiller to site that does not mean that I have progressed a lot. I want to measure the project from effort done point of view.
Han Pekelharing
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I think work execution should be measured in its own appropriate resource , so mhrs,m2, m3, tonnages etc. For the total rollup up a projects progress mhrs are fine as long as there are no purchases/deliveries involved.
A project with engineering/procurement and construction should be measured in cost or a cost-based weightfactor as this is the only common factor for all.
Last , i always prefer to make a combination of all three , quantities, mhrs and cost. More work at the start, but better control ovr the project.