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Isn't every Actual Duration longer than the baseline duration with float a concurrent delay?

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John Reeves
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Isn't every Actual Duration longer than the baseline duration with float a concurrent delay?  -  taking into account possible changes since the baseline (maybe).

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John Reeves
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This is an important issue.  The activity in the schedule, in my opinion, has to include likely non-continuous gaps - it is a time duration - not a work count with credit for skipped days.  This is a big deal in scheduling that does not get enough discussion.  I used to have to make this arguement often because many specs read that logic ties have to be FS - which I think is largely poor practice depending on the size, type, complexity of the project.

Zoltan Palffy
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yes most actual durations are longer then the original durations a lot of times because the work is not continuous for 1 reason or another there is a lot of start and stopping and starting again. 

Rodel Marasigan
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Claiming delay is not as simple as Duration – delay. There is a binding contract that protect each party. If the Owner’s delay, then potential EOT or Contractor’s delay then potential LD. The delay must be justified and conformance with the contract in order to validate if the delay is genuine or rejected. If potential delay is occurring, an notice of delay (NOD) shall be raised and monitored accordingly to informed the clients for the potential delay until it was accepted as delay or EOT entitlement. There are many process to conform on the contract requirements and not just as simple of plus & minus analysis.

John Reeves
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We agree on that. If the contractor said something would take 5 days duration and the actual is 10 days, that is 5 days of delay or concurrent delay if the owner also is delaying something.  It is a bit more complicated with pacing - meaning - why should I hurry if held up when complete anyway...I was just looking to get confirmation on the duration (minus) being a delay - can't see how it wouldn't be.

Rodel Marasigan
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A concurrent delay occurs when two or more independent causes of delay partially or wholly overlap in time and it is important that is the causes of the delays, rather than the delays themselves. It is usually a defence mechanism used to avoid extension of time of any party (owner or contractor). A good example is: “Owner obligation is pre-supply of major equipment which has been delayed for 3 months (12weeks). At the same time, the contractor had a delay of finishing the foundation for the said equipment for 2.5 months (10 weeks). The contractor is claiming an extension of time for whole delay of 12 week for late arrival of the equipment, but the owner used a concurrent delay to reduce the entitlement.

It is true that sometime the timing was not always literally within the exact period of time to be concurrent. If the delay caused is on critical path and the sequenced cannot be changed, non-excusable delays need not occur simultaneously but can be on two parallel critical path chains.

John Reeves
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Ok let me clarify - it is a delay (not concurrent delay, I only called it concurrent delay because it is usually more complicated than "a delay" - there is usually some shared "blame".  Seems like most contractors under-estimate durations, although some of that is pushed by specs that push FS requirements. And all of those would be concurrent delay with Owner Delays if there were.  There is some opinions on whether they have to be in the same period, depends on specifics but there is AACEI docs stating they do not - if more or less on the same sequence.  In summary, seems fairly common to find Dur. at Completion longer than planned and seems fairly easy to use that as concurrent delay.  What am I missing?

John Reeves
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Ok let me clarify - it is a delay (not concurrent delay, I only called it concurrent delay because it is usually more complicated than "a delay".  Seems like most contractors under-estimate durations. And all of those would be concurrent delay with Owner Delays.  There is some opinions on whether they have to be in the same period, depends on specifics but there is AACEI docs stating they do not.

Rodel Marasigan
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Actual Duration longer than the baseline duration with float is nothing to do with concurrent delay. I believe you mis-understood the meaning of concurrent delay.