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Do we need to be recognised / certified / accredited?

15 replies [Last post]
Dave Crosby
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This does seem to be generally agreed. If it is agreed then what should the specific goals / aims of the accreditation be?

Replies

Scarllet Pimpernel
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Dear Gere,

Look around you. Look what is happening in the coast. I believe a lot of guys where certified/accredited/recognized, but what have they done to your coast. The gulf of Mexico.

The best you can do is to go the the gulf and do your share. If you can make a difference, you will be the next millionaire, no need for certification/accreditation. Just common sense.

The top honchos will not bother you anyway that is why US of A have this biggest problem in the gulf of Mexico in the first place.

Thank you,
Scarlett
Rafael Davila
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Gere,

There are many diplomas you can buy for a fee, mostly from “self-proclaimed” leading institutes that have no formal accreditation by recognized associations.

Look for the Council for Higher Education Accreditation (CHEA) database for programs that are accredited by United States accrediting organizations that have been recognized either by CHEA or by the United States Department of Education (USDE) or both.

http://www.chea.org/search/default.asp

Is your education, don’t buy cheap diplomas. Who do you think an interviewer will give higher valuation when formal education is relevant, for sure is not going to be to a person with a diploma from an unrecognized institution? Be real, Texas is on the USA, the interviewer in case of doubt will play it safe.

Best Regards,
Rafael
Samer Zawaydeh
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Dear Gere,

This is because tools are changing rapidly and you need to keep sharpening the saw.

I recommend that you check the training centers as well. They always search for seasoned and experienced people to teach the young generation. And the pay is good.

With kind regards,

Samer
Gere J Minnick
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As a currently unemployed planner/estimator in the oil industry piping trades, I have been working continuously for the past six years without interuption until the bottom fell out in Texas back in late 2008. Since then, I have found that accredidation is indeed invaluable even if only to get you past the know nothing recruiters I routinely face when applying for openings which for all intents and purposes I am highly qualified to perform according to the job descriptions posted. Unfortunately, I got all of my previuos work thru word of mouth from referrels by folks who had worked with me and knew of my skills at this work. As I was always told that field planners were always in demand because they had the experience behind them to know what was needed to plan a job, I have found it quite demoralizing to now see that most planner openings are really looking for a seasoned P6 scheduler instead. Having worked inside of P3 and Access schedules I find it hard to figure out why I am now deemed unemployable most of the time and not even worthy of a call back or phone inteview. So, in my opinion, the paper trail is needed in today’s documentation first mindset with employers.
Gary Whitehead
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I got a copy, but didn’t have a chance to review it in time.

Mike: The copies were subject to an NDA, so afraid I can’t share it. In fact, I think I’m meant to destroy it now the review period is over.
Toby Hunt
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Did anyone take part in the industry peer review of the CIOB’s draft Guide to Good Practice in the Management of Time in Complex Construction Projects?

Mike Testro
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Hi Toby

I tried to get a copy but I was time barred - do you have a spare one?

Best regards

Mike Testro
Ernesto Montales
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I think the main objective of accreditation is for continuous professional development, such as the PMI, CIOB, ICE, AACE, PEO and alike. It will add value and compliment your experience, not only it will proved your level of competency at a company level but more importantly to the industry.

We live in exponential times, change occurs very fast and we must keep up and adapt with changes in order the profession to prosper. The only way we can keep up is with through accreditation.

Cheers,

Ernesto
Samer Zawaydeh
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Dear Aileen,

The answer to Do we need... "is it depends". Most of the people working in the industry do not need to be certified, because they are already working without certification. That means that they do not "need to" be certified.

It depends on the size and level of the job that you are doing. It like tendering for a job. If you have a job that can be done by a 4th grade contractor, why do you need to call a 1st Grade contractor to do it. It will cost you more! You will always have a range of people covering the spectrum working in each field. But if they want to move up the ladder, then they need the certification. That will open the door, but will not keep you on the job if you do not know the nuts and bolts.

With kind regards,

Samer
Aileen Fowler
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The purpose of cert/accr is for the society or institute to ensure members meet their requirements, demonstrating that to be considered a professional member of such a body, they have not only acquired qualifications in a relevant field but have extensive practical application of the methods and processes specific to that profession. And once accepted as a member they must continue their personal development which is usually assessed every three years, failure to do so results in suspension or removal of the members affiliation with the institute. In the case of PMBOK PMP and PSP this is the current situation, you pass the exam but you must then maintain an online log of CPD points, which will be checked every 3 years by PMI for compliance, points are awarded for writing reports and research anaylsis if successfully posted on the online PMI website and attending PMI accredited seminars and workshops. So in conclusion I do disagree that cert/accr is just buttering your profile, top organisation take a dim view of qualified but no experience "software jocks" and I have had the displeasure in working alongside them (read this as carrying them:)
Dave Crosby
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I like your idea Gary. A thumbs up from me.
Gary Whitehead
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I think the aim of the accreditation should be to do both. I would like to see:
1) A lower-level qualification that guarantees a minimum level of knowledge and expertese, to filter out those who sell themselves as a planner after a 2-day Forgetrak course.
2) one or more higher levels of qualification that is dependent on experience and some form of peer assesment, to guarantee appropriate candiates for senior planner & planning manager roles.
Dave Crosby
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Jamie,
That depends on the specific aims of accreditation.
Is the aim to certify the person has a foundation of knowledge suitable for the profession?
Is the aim to certify a certain track record in the profession?
Is it both?

If the aim is to establish a common foundation of knowledge (like the PMBOK) then I think it’s fine that thousands of people attain this certification and put it on their CVs. Why not? It doesn’t have to be highly exclusive.

If the aim is to certify a professional track record then obviously only experienced planners can achieve this.

Jaime Lozo
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These accreditation, recognition, etc... will benefit the individual with less experience just to boost their cv with the intension of application acceptance. These additional certificate is redundant in the sense that employer are looking for planners with professional background experiences gained from prestigious projects by the highly rated companies. Suffice it to say, that cert/accr is just like buttering up your profile.
Charleston-Joseph...
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the goal of accreditation is to deliver the best ever planning and scheduling expertise and professionalism

the aim of accreditation is to ensure that individual members of Planning Planet will have the essential knowledge and skills to practice the profession of planning and scheduling

the aim of accreditation is ...

the aim of accreditation is ...

THE NEXT STEPS IS HOWWWWWWWWWWWW!!!!!

Writing goals and aims is different from attainment of goals and aims.

Cheers
happy planning and scheduling