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Tender Planning

3 replies [Last post]
Stevan Sarapa
User offline. Last seen 8 years 29 weeks ago. Offline
Joined: 19 Sep 2002
Posts: 7
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Hi everybody,

I am making GanttChart for a five star hotel, which is around 30000s.m. I am not sure how detail,mean how many activities should I have done.
All the work I am doing only to offer a bid.

Regards,
Stevan Sarapa

Replies

Ali Vessali
User offline. Last seen 4 years 23 weeks ago. Offline
Joined: 16 Sep 2001
Posts: 55
Stevan;

I think the proposal schedule is as important as detailed project schedule is. During the tender period you should have a good understanding of the project and define the method statement and choose proper technology to do the job. Without having a good schedule showing the real critical path, how you can define the minimum time requirement? How you can analyze the project cost which is the most important issue in your proposal documents. You can show just Bar chart in proposal schedule without using CPM tools but at least your team should have a very depth thinking of the duration and dependencies of each task before start to draw a Bar Chart.
Actually, what we are doing for our proposal schedule are as follows:
1-Define the project scope in detail as much as RFP documents allow.
2-Prepare the Base Schedule using CPM tools (P3, MS-Project, ….) with enough detail to define the critical path (Max. level-3).
3-Check the contract Milestones and adjust the logic of the schedule accordingly to meet all Contract Target Dates issued in RFP.
4-Estimate require resources including Man-Power, Equipment and Material based on the time frame defined in the schedule
5-For proposal document the Base Schedule will be summarized to show just level 1 or 2 of the project and not all detailed activities.
6-The logistic drawings (and Project Snapshots for huge project) will be prepared to support the method statement and schedule.
7-After award contract, the proposal schedule will be developed in more detail by keeping the time frames of proposal schedule.

Hope it helps.
Regards,
Ali
Forum Guest
User offline. Last seen 8 weeks 10 hours ago. Offline
Joined: 28 Jan 2009
Posts: 0
Groups: None
Stevan;

I think the proposal schedule is as important as detailed project schedule is. During the tender period you should have a good understanding of the project and define the method statement and choose proper technology to do the job. Without having a good schedule showing the real critical path, how you can define the minimum time requirement? How you can analyze the project cost which is the most important issue in your proposal documents. You can show just Bar chart in proposal schedule without using CPM tools but at least your team should have a very depth thinking of the duration and dependencies of each task before start to draw a Bar Chart.
Actually, what we are doing for our proposal schedule are as follows:
1-Define the project scope in detail as much as RFP documents allow.
2-Prepare the Base Schedule using CPM tools (P3, MS-Project, ….) with enough detail to define the critical path (Max. level-3).
3-Check the contract Milestones and adjust the logic of the schedule accordingly to meet all Contract Target Dates issued in RFP.
4-Estimate require resources including Man-Power, Equipment and Material based on the time frame defined in the schedule
5-For proposal document the Base Schedule will be summarized to show just level 1 or 2 of the project and not all detailed activities.
6-The logistic drawings (and Project Snapshots for huge project) will be prepared to support the method statement and schedule.
7-After award contract, the proposal schedule will be developed in more detail by keeping the time frames of proposal schedule.

Hope it helps.
Regards,
Ali
Tomas Rivera
User offline. Last seen 2 years 36 weeks ago. Offline
Joined: 2 May 2001
Posts: 139
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Stevan:

There are several factors to consider:

One, you do not want to put too much effort since it is a tender proposal. You just want to show the general intention of your company.
On the other hand it might be advantageous to show a good planning capability by doing a well devised schedule, although brief.
Third, you are talking about doing a gantt chart, seems to me you are not using the critical path method. You need to evaluate this and make a desicion if have not done it yet.
Fourth, you can do a much as time allows.
Fifth, if you do not review your project in depth, the more detailed your schedule the greater risk you are taking about showing activities that might be scheduled in an incorrect place in time, or incorrectly coordinated with other activities.
Having said the above, I would expect between 30 and 50 activities if using the gantt chart method. You can go up to 250 activities if using the critical path method. The latter if you analize your project in greater depth.
I hope this helps

Tomas Rivera