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Pre-tender Planning & Post tender planning

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Balaji Surendiran
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Hai Planners I’m new to this Field I’ve some queries,as U planners have vast experience U could help me.
1.Difference in planning between pre-tendering & post Tendering?
2.Usually what r the coulmns (like task name,WBS..) r required for a standard planning practice?
I’ve lot of queries if anyone is interested in answering the above it will be helpful
Balaji surendiran

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Daniel Limson
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Sorry for the late response to this subject. The word pre-tender means prior to the tendering period, hence, this is the time when a planner who usually work with the Owner/Project Manager prepares the initial project master program, identifying milestones and key dates and constraints usually done in collaboration with the owner’s requirements.

The second subject which came up is regarding the number of schedules you need to prepare if you are working with a contractor. I believed you only need to prepare one master programme, any other program are just a by product of the master programme where you perform "what if analysis" for different scenarios (work arounds, workflows) or making an an aggressive internal schedule. If you need to maintain a second schedule, there is a feature or technique in P3 for updating your second schedule globally without having to update the second schedule all over again, as long as your activity IDs are the same with Master schedule.

Regards,
Daniel
Shahzad Munawar
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Balaji

Be acknowledged that Master schedule is always one. Based On which you may create hundred schedules (inhouse) for your own ease.

One Week Lookhead
Bi Weekly Lookhead
Quarterly Lookhead
Monthly ….

and so so
Balaji Surendiran
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Excatly Alex
Two schedules R required for any project.I completely agree with u
Bala
Alex Wong
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David

I understand what you mean, contractor usually try to build a schedule with minimum float, that is what I was suggested where some time planner keep two set of schedule, one for the clients - for contract purposes - Claims ... and one with realistic timing and $.

And sometime we integrated the two schedules together.

In related to float and contingency, I think we need to have a separate topic, because I understand this is a great discussion and a lot of different view points on this topic.

Regards

Alex

David Bordoli
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Hi Bala and Shazad

Do you know of ’Parkinson’s Law’?

WORK EXPANDS SO AS TO FILL THE TIME AVAILABLE FOR ITS COMPLETION

This was first written in the ’Economist’ magaizine in 1955 by C Northcote Parkinson. I think it is very important to planners. What it means is if you allow two weeks for an activity then it will take two weeks, if you allow six months then it will take six months. In fact it’s a bit worse than that because ther is a risk of over-run. A prudent programmer would allow less than the available time to carry out tasks to build in a contingency.

The way the law stands though at the moment (at least in the UK) this does lead to some problems, showing too much float in a programme (to provide the contingency) can be used by the first person who needs it and that may destroy your contingency and make the whole situation worse.

I don’t know what the answer to this is. What is the situation in countries other than the UK regarding the use of float in delay situations?

David
Balaji Surendiran
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hello dear,
For course it should be , letz take an example
A project with time period : 365 days(as given in contract) but u know the project can be completed in 300 days from ur planning & resources but no contractor take risk to show 300days completion to consultant. So u prepare 2 programmes with 300days for internal purpose & other 365days for consultant I’m I right??? If the project completes in 300 days well & good If not in 365days then no risk.
pls give ur opinion
Balaji Surendiran
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hello dear,
For course it should be , letz take an example
A project with time period : 365 days(as given in contract) but u know the project can be completed in 300 days from ur planning & resources but no contractor take risk to show 300days completion to consultant. So u prepare 2 programmes with 300days for internal purpose & other 365days for consultant I’m I right??? If the project completes in 300 days well & good If not in 365days then no risk.
Shahzad Munawar
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Balagi , I totally disagree with this

" So for a Planner it is required to prepare two type of programme one to satisfy the consultant & other for practical purpose."

Schedule should be one but in different Levels such as 1, 2, 3 and 4
Balaji Surendiran
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Thank you very much for ur help.
you can be mail me at: bala_vrce@yahoo.com
Cheers
Bala
Alex Wong
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Hope I understand your question:
Is planner always keep two set of schedules (1 for the clients and 1 for internal use) yes and a lot of the time we integrate both schedules together and run a filter before submitted to the client.

Back to your original question: Pre-tender progarmme is usually only use as a reference and never update any further after the tender is submitted. Basically it is a very high level programme.

Once the contract is issued, contractor require to prepare a more details programme, which might totally different from the original pre-tender programme. They serve two different functions.
Balaji Surendiran
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Hai Mr.Alex Wong
That was really useful to me but then If u r in contracting side the programme which u submit for consultant(engineer) is different from the one which u use practically ,is it not so?? So for a Planner it is required to prepare two type of programme one to satisfy the consultant & other for practical purpose.Im I right??
Cheers
Bala
Alex Wong
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Pre-tendering is usually very brief programme where you only have few weeks to submit your tender documents including the programme. As a result, usually it only contain the critical milestone. Activities with long durations.

Post-tendering is rather a lot more details. I includes master programme, design programme, delivery programme, construction programme, T&C programme ....
in each phases of the project. It usually resource loaded +/ cash flow loaded.

Activity break down (WBS) is project to project, some clients do have their own Standard WBS, where the organisation(Contractor) may also have their own WBS. It is very important to integrate the two into your programme.