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meaning of each P6 column.

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rocco spena
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Dear all, I kindly ask you where I could find the meaning of each column of primavera P6. There is a guide? Thanks Best Regards

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Zoltan Palffy
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Activity- An individual work task that is the basic component of a project.

Activity ID -  A Unique Identifier

Activity Codes -Values assigned to project activities to organize then into manageable groups for updating, analyzing, reporting, plotting, and summarizing.

Actual Cost -The cost incurred to date for a resource or activity.

Actual Dates - Start(AS) and Finish (AF) dates that you record for an activity that has progress or is

complete.

Actual Quantity -The amount of a resource used to date.

Backward Pass -The calculation of a network's late dates starting at th eend date of the project .

Bar Chart -The graphical display of activities according to time. Relationships between activities are not shown. A bar chart is also called a Gantt Chart.

Baseline Schedule -The original planned schedule for a project that does not have any progress.

Budget -The estimate of the total units or costs required by a resource or cost account for an activity.

Calendar - The workdays and holidays defined for a project that determine when an activity can be

scheduled.

Completion - The date on which a project is to be finished.

Constraint - A restriction imposed on the start or finish of an activity.

Critical Activity - An activity that has the least amount of total float.

Critical Path - The series of activities in a project that will take the longest to complete.

Critical Path Method (CPM) - The calculation of the earliest and latest start and finish dates of activities based on their duration and relationships to other activities.

Data Date - The date used as the starting point for schedule calculations.

Driving - A predecessor/successor relationship in which the predecessor relationship determines the successor's early dates.

Duration - The amount of time (in workdays) needed to complete an activity.

Early Start (ES) - The earliest date when an activity can begin after its predecessors have been completed.

Earned Value - The value of work performed rather than actual work performed.

Exception - A day when work must occur that was originally designated as a nonworkday.

Finish to Finish (FF) - A type of relationship in which a successor activity finish depends on its predecessor activity's finish.

Finish-to Start (FS) - A type of relationship in which a successor activity can begin only when its predecessor activity finishes.

Float - The amount of time that the start or finish of an activity can be delayed without affecting the project finish date.

Forward Pass - The calculation of the network's early dates starting at the project start date or data date.

Free Float - The amount of time that an activity's early start can be delayed without delaying the early start of a successor activity.

Lag - An offset or delay from an activity to its successor.

Late Finish (LF) - The latest date when an activity can start without delaying the project's completion.

Late Start (LS) - The latest date when an activity can start without delaying the project's completion.

Loop - Circular logic within a network.

Milestone - An activity that represents a significant point in time, that has zero duration.

Negative Float - The total number of days that the start or finish of an activity exceeds the time allowed. Negative float indicates a delay in the schedule.

Negative Lag - An offset or lead time from an activity to its successor in which the successor's start date is earlier than the predecessor's start date.

Network - The series of activities required to complete a project.

Nonworkperiod - A period of time when work cannot occur.

Open End - An activity that has no successor or predecessor relationships to other activities in the network.

Out-of-Sequence Progress - Work completed for an activity before it is logically scheduled to occur.

Percent Complete - The proportion of an activity that is complete.

Performance Measurement - The comparison of the current plan to a target plan to assess whether it is progressing as intended.

Planning Unit - The increment of time used to schedule a project. The planning unit can be in hours, days, weeks, or months.

Predecessor - An activity that must logically occur before another activity.

Progress - The level of completion of a work activity.

Resources - The people, materials, equipment or services required to complete a project.

Schedule - A list of the activities needed to complete a project, along with their start and finish dates.

Schedule Calculation - The calculation of early and late dates for each activity in the project.

Slack - See Float.

Slippage - Lateness determined by measuring the target finish of an activity from its actual or current early finish.

Sorting - The arrangement of data in a specific sequence.

Start-to Start (SS) - A type of relationship in which a successor's start depends on the start of its predecessor.

Status - The process of updating a project by indicating progress at regular intervals.

Successor - An activity that must logically occur after another activity.

Target - A project plan that can be compared to the current schedule to measure progress.

Task - A unit of work. Also is called an activity.

Total Float (TF) - The total number of days that the start or finish of an activity can be delayed without affecting the project finish date. Float can be negative, zero, or positive.

Updating - The process of recording progress in a project at regular intervals.

Variance - The difference between the current and target schedule dates.

Work Breakdown Structure (WBS) - The graphical depiction of the hierarchy of work needed to complete a project.

 

Percent Complete Type

The activity percent complete type is one of "Duration", "Units", or "Physical". The percent complete type controls whether the Activity% Complete is tied to

the Duration % Complete, the Units %Complete, or the Physical % Complete for the activity. Set thepercent complete type to "Duration" for activities which

are duration driven, for example. Administration tasks and training classes. Set the percent complete type to "Physical" for activities which are work-product

driven, for example, creating a document or a product. Set the percent complete type to "Units" for activities which are work effort driven, for example,

providing a consulting service.

 

Physical % Complete

The activity physical percent complete. The physical percent complete reflects the actual progress made on theactivity's work products so far. Physical

percent complete can be manually entered by people familiar with the status of the activity's work products or it can be based on the completion of assigned

Steps. Always in the range 0 to 100.

 

Duration%Complete

The percent complete of the activity duration. Computed as ((Planned Duration- Remain Duration) / Planned Duration) * 100. Always in the range 0 to 100.

The planned duration is taken from the current plan, not from the current baseline.

 

Duration % of Planned

The activity actual duration percent of planned. Computed as (Actual Duration / BL Duration) * 100. The value can exceed 100. The BL Duration is the

activity's at complete duration from the current baseline.

 

Activity % Complete

The activity percent complete. This value is tied to the activity Duration % Complete, Units % Complete, or Physical % Complete, depending on the setting for

the activity's Percent Complete Type, which is one of "Duration", "Units". or "Physical". Always in the range 0 to 100.

 

Schedule % Complete

Schedule % Complete specifies how much of the activity's baseline duration has been completed so far. Computed based on where the current data date

falls between the activity's baseline start and finish dates. If the data dale is earlier than the BL Start, the Schedule % Complete is 0.If the data date is later

than the BL Finish, theSchedule % Complete is 100. The Schedule% Complete indicates how much of the activity duration should be currently completed,

relative to the selected baseline.

Note: Summary Schedule percent complete when displayed on an organize band, will ALWAYS be calculated as (BCWS*100)/BAC, regardless of what

earned value technique is selected for the activity's WBS.

 

Performance % Compete

Performance percent complete is used to compute earned value and may be based on the Activity % Complete, on the 0/100 rule, on the 50/50 rule, etc.

, depending on the technique for computing earned-value percent complete for the activity's WBS. The Performance % Complete specifies what percentage of

the activity's planned worth has been earned so far.

Note: Summary Performance percent complete when displayed on an organize band, will ALWAYS be calculated as (BCWP * 100) / BAC, regardless of

what earned value technique is selected for the activity's WBS.

 

Labor Cost % Complete

The percent complete of costs for all labor resources assigned to the activity. Computed as (Actual labor Cost / At Complete labor Cost) * 100.

Always in the range 0 to 100.

 

Non-Labor Cost % Complete

The percent complete of costs for all non-labor resources assigned to the activity. Computed as (Actual Non-Labor Cost / At Complete Non-Labor Cost) * 100

Always in the range 0 to 100.

 

Expense Cost % Complete

The percent complete of costs for all expenses associated with the activity. Computed as (Actual Expense Cost / At Complete Expense Cost) * 100.

Always in the range 0 to 100.

 

Cost % Complete

The percent complete of costs for all laborresources. non-labor resources. and expenses for the activity. Computed as (Actual Total Cost / At Complete Total Cost) * 100.

Always in the range 0 to 100.

 

Cost % of Planned

The activity actual cost percent of planned. Computed as (Actual Total Cost / BL Total Cost)  * 100,or equivalently as (ACWP / BAC) " 100.

The value can exceed 100 The baseline total cost is the activity's at complete cost from the current baseline.

 

Units % Complete

The percent complete of units for all labor and non-labor resources assigned to the activity. Computed as (Actual Units / At Complete Units) * 100.

 Always in the range 0 to 100.

 

Labor Units % Complete

The percent complete of units for all labor resources for the activity. Computed as (Actual Labor Units / At Complete labor Units) * 100. Always in the range of 0 to 100

 

Non-Labor Units % Complete

The percent complete of units for all non-labor resources for the activity. Computed as (Actual Non-Labor Units / AtComplete Non-labor Units) *100.

Always in the range 0 to 100

 

Steps % Complete

The percent complete using the WBS Milestones that are assigned to a WBS level.

Computed as Actual Weight of Completed Milestones / Total Possible Weight of All Milestones

ActivityTypes defined

In P6 there are six different options for activity types in P6. Each of the activity types are used for

different situations and control how an activity’s duration and dates are calculated and are listed below:

 

TaskDependent – This is the most common type used for an activity. For a task dependent activity, the

assigned resources are schedule according to the activity’s calendar rather than according to their

designated resource calendars. Use task dependent activities when multiple resources assigned to the

same activity need to work together. Duration is input as the original duration.

Example – FRP (form,rebar,pour) deck slab level 2 here there could be three resources on the same

activity, the carpenter for forming, the iron workers for rebar installation and the laborers for pouring

the concrete.

 

Resourcedependent ‐ Resources assigned to this type of activity are scheduled to work according to the

resources’ calendars rather than the activity’s calendar. The activity’s duration is determined by the

availabilityof resources to work on the activity. Use resource dependent activities when multiple

resources assigned to the same activity can work independently.

Example – Installation of overhead conduit level 2. Here you can input the man‐hours in terms of units

and the duration for the activity will be calculated for you.

 

Levelof effort ‐ A level of effort activity’s duration is dependent on its predecessor and/or successor

activities. Level of effort activities cannot have constraints assigned to them. Level of effort activities are

not included when leveling resources. Use level of effort activities for on‐going tasks that depend on

other activities.

Example, you could assign level of effort activities for clerical work, a security guard, or even some

aspects of project management.

A level of effort activity is similar to but different from a hammock activity.

A level of effort activity uses its assigned calendar to summarize its dates. Hammocks are not

scheduled using their own calendar.

 Any type of relationship can be assigned to a level of effort activity. Only a start‐to‐start and

finish‐to‐finish relationship can be assigned to a hammock activity.

 A level of effort activity's duration is calculated from the earliest early start of its

predecessors/successors(linked to the start end of the level of effort activity) to the latest

earlyfinish of its predecessors/successors (linked to the finish end of the level of effort

activity).

A hammock activity’s duration is calculated from the earliest early start of its predecessors to

the latest early finish of its successor activities.

 

Startmilestone ‐ A start milestone activity marks the beginning of a major stage in the project. Since a

start milestone activity does not have a duration, it is sometimes referred to as a “zero duration activity.”

A start milestone may have a primary resource and expenses associated with it, but cannot have

resource assignments, role assignments, or time‐based costs such as labor. You can assign work

products or documents to a start milestone

 

Example – Start of access into Area B

 

Finishmilestone ‐ A finish milestone activity marks the end of a major stage in the project. Since a finish

milestone activity does not have a duration, it is sometimes referred to as a “zero duration activity.”

AnyContractual Milestones typically use this activity type.

 

A finish milestone may have a primary resource and expenses associated with it, but cannot have

resource assignments, role assignments, or time‐based costs such as labor. You can assign work

products and documents to a finish milestone.

Example – Permanent Power Complete or Substantial Completion or Project Complete

 

WBSsummary ‐ A WBS summary activity is used to summarize a WBS level. The WBS summary activity

comprises a group of activities that share a common WBS level.

 

Example ‐ all activities whose WBS codes start with A (A.1, A.1.1, A.1.1.2, A.2, A.3 and so forth) can be

part of one WBS activity whose WBS code is A. At a lower level, all activities whose WBS codes start with

A.1 (A.1, A.1.1, A.1.1.2 and so forth) can be part of a WBS activity whose WBS code is A.1.

The dates calculated on a WBS summary activity are based on the earliest start date of the activities

in the group and the latest finish date of these activities. The WBS summary activity duration is calculated

based on its assigned calendar.

 You cannot assign constraints to WBS summary activities.

Start On

A restriction placed on an activity by imposing a start date. The start on constraint can delay an early start or accelerate a late start to satisfy the imposed date. Unlike the mandatory start constraint, which can violate the network logic, this constraint protects it.

Start On or After

A restriction imposed on an activity that limits the earliest time it can begin. When calculating a schedule, the start on or after constraint is used in the forward pass only if the calculated early start date will be earlier than the imposed date. This constraint affects only early dates.  The early start date of an activity with a start on or after constraint cannot be earlier than the imposed date, although the network logic may cause the early start to occur later.

Start On or Before

A restriction imposed on an activity that limits the latest date it can start. When calculating a schedule, the start on or before constraint is used in the backward pass only if the calculated late start date will be later than the imposed date. This constraint may decrease total float. It only affects late dates.

Finish Constraints

Finish On

A restriction placed on an activity by imposing a finish date. The finish on constraint can delay an early finish or accelerate a late finish to satisfy the imposed date.

Finish On or After

A restriction imposed on an activity that limits the earliest time it can complete. The finish on or after constraint reduces float to coordinate parallel activities, ensuing that the finish of an activity is not scheduled before the specified date.  It is usually applied to activities that have few predecessors that must finish before the next phase of a project.

Finish On or Before

A restriction imposed on an activity that limits the latest time it can be finished.  The finish on or before constraint affects only the late dates.  Use this constraint to ensure that the late finish date of an activity is no later than the date imposed.

Mandatory Constraints

Start

A restriction imposed on an activity that sets its early and late start dates equal to the date specified.  The mandatory early start date is used regardless of its effect on network logic. A mandatory early start date could affect the late dates for all activities that lead to the constrained activity and all early dates for the activities that lead from the constrained activity.  When mandatory constraints are placed on calendar non-work time, the early and late dates are not set equal to each other. The early date is moved forward to the next valid work time and the late date is moved back (earlier) to the firs valid work time.  This can cause negative float in the schedule.

Finish

A restriction imposed on an activity that sets its early and late finish dates equal to the date specified. The mandatory finish date is used regardless of its effect on network logic. This constraint affects the late dates for all activities that lead to the constrained activity and all early dates for the activities that lead from the constrained activity. When mandatory constraints are placed on a calendar non-work time, the early and late dates are not set equal to each other.  The early date is moved forward to the next valid work time and the late date is moved back (earlier) to the first valid work time.  This can cause negative float in the schedule.

Late Constraint

As Late as Possible

A restriction imposed on an activity or work unit with positive float that allows it to start as late as possible without delaying its successors. This constraint sets the early dates as late as possible without affecting successor activities (Except for Prefabrication Activities)

Steven Auld
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The p6 help file also includes a data dictionary with descriptions of what the different columns are.
Steven